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Thread: WW2 Double barrel shotguns!!

  1. #1

    Default WW2 Double barrel shotguns!!

    I have two ordnance stamped doubles. A L.C. Smith with flaming bomb only, and a Hunter Arms Co. with R.L.B., flaming bomb and crossed cannons. The L.C. Smith is a field grade, pistol grip stock, and single brass bead.
    The Hunter Arms Co. is a fulton model, strait stock, with double ivory beads. Very fancy wood, maybe a trap model?
    Does anybody have one of these to compare ordnance stamps?
    Has anybody seen a Hunter Arms Co. with ordnance stamps?
    Thanks for your time!
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  2. #2

    Default US Doubles

    More pics!!
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    I know of a collector with an LC Smith that is marked with an RLB inspector's mark, Ordnance bomb, and Ordnance crossed cannons mark. I believe there is also one pictured in Mr. Canfield's Military shotgun book.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Wasn't Hunter Arms made by Ithaca? Those numbers might be in the records, and only Ithaca and Remington got RLB marks as far as I can remember.

    You got a real LC Smith!
    There is one out there that is marked "USAF" which people think means US Air Force. NOT There was no US AIR FORCE in WWII it is a factory inspectors mark. Even fooled the author of the LS Smith book, but he corrected it in the addendum.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    A little research turned up this:

    the lc smiths were made by hunter arms in fulton NY from 1914-1945 ,,in 1945 marlin bought hunter arms and continued to make them as lc smith untill 1951,,then they resurected them again in1968 and made them untill 1973when production ceased,

    So the RLB would be right since that is in the Rochester Ordinance District.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Houston, Texas
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    Hunter Arms was the successor to the Baker Gun Company which became L.C. Smith when he owned the company for a few years before founding a company he is more famous for, the Smith Corona Typewriter Company. The L.C. Smith gun probably really should have been the "Alexander Brown" gun for the engineer who designed it when Smith owned the company.

    Smith sold the company to the seven Hunter Brothers who also made Hunter Fans. All L.C. smith and Hunter Arms boxlock guns from 1914 until Marlin bought the company in the 1940s are Hunter Arms guns.

    As to the OP, I personally have seen two Ord. marked U.S. Property L.C. Smith shotguns. The guns were obtained by the military for recreational purposes and not for combat. When I was in the Army in Korea in the 1960s there were two Stevens 311s in the arms room that could be checked out for sporting purposes.

    Ithaca never had anything to do with any Hunter Arms firearms.
    Last edited by Art; 03-09-2011 at 02:56.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    You are correct about Ithaca, as I posted above.

    Just beware of those USAF marked LC Smiths. They are not military. The ones pictured above are.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    You know, there was an article that I read someplace in the past about a General in the South Pacific who took his double barrel out to bird hunt or something. So some of those guns may have made it into a combat zone.

  9. #9

    Default Cody papers

    I have papers on the LC Smith. Its interesting that the LC Smith is not stamped like the example in Mr. Canfields book, but the Hunter Arms gun is?
    I have contacted cody museum about Hunter arms gun, hopefully I will get some more info on it.
    Is it a procurement piece or a contract gun like the LC Smith?
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    Last edited by trenchcrazy; 03-09-2011 at 09:39. Reason: spelling

  10. #10

    Default Update from Cody!

    I just got papers on the Hunter Arms gun. It is a contract gun just like the L.C. Smith! Mr. Canfield states the L.C. Smiths were purchased from May 9,1942 and April 9, 1943. This is June 1942, maybe the early guns were Hunter Arms guns?
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