Turner Slings
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4
1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Thread: M-1 sight alignment

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Kalifornia
    Posts
    33

    Default M-1 sight alignment

    Received a post war Springfield several months ago and have only had one trip to the range with it. Had to adjust the sight to the right almost to the 2nd to last reference mark on the rear sight. Front sight looks center. Can this be fixed to return the center mark to the center mark on the receiver? Where to start? Barrel is TE of 3 and the MW is 1. Thanks, Ron

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Loveland, Ohio
    Posts
    1,598

    Default

    Sounds like it isn't indexed properly. Proper index should be 20 minutes before TDC(1/3rd of a degree with an Electrician's Protractor) in relation to the front sight base.
    If that isn't the problem you may have a bent barrel, that's way too much adjustment.
    "Diligentia, Vis, Celeritas"
    Jeff Cooper

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    1,619

    Default

    Thats a lot of movement but the front sight should be adjusted first than work the rear.

    Set your rear sight to zero and bring your group to center with the front sight. With my front sight flush to the left side of the front sight base my rear sight is at 0. If you do a search for something like "how do I zero my Garand?" you should be able to get the amount of movement for inches of bullet strike. I dont remember exactly but it was like .018 inches of front sight movement for an inch windage at 100 yards. I used the tail end of a digital caliper to set the front sight.

    Dont use .018 confirm the figure before using.
    Last edited by pmclaine; 06-21-2011 at 04:57.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Elliston, Ohio
    Posts
    3,028

    Default

    FWIW, and not saying that Dave may not be right.....but EVERY Garand I've ever owned required the front sight to be indexed "off-center", usually to the right, some VERY good-shooting rifles a LOT off-center!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    497

    Default

    You've already done the "hard" part . . . . . now all you have to do, is . . . move the FRONT sight to the LEFT the same amount (so long as the front sight does NOT overhang the side of the gas cylinder) that the REAR sight is now to the right . . . . THEN center the REAR, and you're "good to go"!
    Cylinders were changed to the so-called "wide pad" for just this exact reason!--JIm
    Last edited by JimF; 06-22-2011 at 05:56. Reason: Had the direction reversed

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Southern Indiana and Illinois
    Posts
    279

    Default

    I am relatively certain it is .008" to effect a change in one minute increments. Which equates in one click of the rear sight.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Mesa, AZ
    Posts
    3,705

    Default

    That's a lot of adjustment to the rear sight. The front sight can be moved to negate that, but that doesn't coounter that your rear sight sets a logrithem(maybe a sloppy use of the word) thats hard to ignore. If you put your rear sight in the center and have to move the front sight nearly off the gas cylinder to get on paper I'd suspect and out a align barrel or a bent barrel. Bent barrels are a distinct possibility. I had one once. Yours, if it is bent would only be bent a little. The one I had took radical coounter movements to the rear and front sight to get on paper.
    Last edited by dryheat; 06-22-2011 at 02:22.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Southern USA
    Posts
    4,898

    Default

    Contrary to our esteemed experts who have chimed in on this topic, they forgot one possible issue that may affect every shooter's sight alignment. Personal eye differences.

    Everyone sees things different, eyes focus different, especially once one reaches a certain age, like after puberty. Therefore what one person may be seeing through a sight, through the front post, then the target, is probably different than the way someone else sees it.

    What I am getting at, just because you have to move your front sight one way or another, don't be dragging out your sledge hammer to "straighten your bent barrel". It just could be YOU and the way you see things.

    One unrelated story here. About 10-12 years ago I ran into a guy who had been on an Army shooting team. We shared many similar thoughts on guns. Somehow the topic of "sight alignment" came about and I mentioned the "6 o'clock view" versus the "center of mass" view. He said that some had a problem with the "round" view so they sighted in on the UPPER LEFT Corner of the target, then adjusted the sight to bring it into the center black. As I thought about it, it made perfect sense. Sighting in on a SQUARE spot was easier than a round one.

    So many different ways to skin a cat. And improve your shooting at the same time.
    --------------------------------
    Certified Internet Warrior Status: Achieved.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    6,059

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by UUURah View Post
    Contrary to our esteemed experts who have chimed in on this topic, they forgot one possible issue that may affect every shooter's sight alignment. Personal eye differences.

    Everyone sees things different, eyes focus different, especially once one reaches a certain age, like after puberty. Therefore what one person may be seeing through a sight, through the front post, then the target, is probably different than the way someone else sees it.

    What I am getting at, just because you have to move your front sight one way or another, don't be dragging out your sledge hammer to "straighten your bent barrel". It just could be YOU and the way you see things.

    One unrelated story here. About 10-12 years ago I ran into a guy who had been on an Army shooting team. We shared many similar thoughts on guns. Somehow the topic of "sight alignment" came about and I mentioned the "6 o'clock view" versus the "center of mass" view. He said that some had a problem with the "round" view so they sighted in on the UPPER LEFT Corner of the target, then adjusted the sight to bring it into the center black. As I thought about it, it made perfect sense. Sighting in on a SQUARE spot was easier than a round one.

    So many different ways to skin a cat. And improve your shooting at the same time.
    You took the words right out of my mouth. When I was in basic training a sizeable number of trainees dope included a click or two of deflection one way or another. If I used one of their rifles and adjusted the sights for me (15 clicks of elevation "0" windage) I was right on. There are a lot of variables.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Loveland, Ohio
    Posts
    1,598

    Default

    .008" of movement in the front sight will move point of impact 1" at 100 yards, but, you only have about five inches of adjustment each way. As John stated, alot of Garands do have slight indexing problems. Can't remember for sure but, I believe that the plus or minus on indexing was 1 degree. Something else, if you're not planning on shooting matches and you're not anal about your Garands, As long as you can get on at 100 yards, have at it. But, over 90% of the Garands I've worked on over the years that had sighting problems ended up being at least 2-3 degrees over or underdrawn.All one needs to check indexing is a barrel-vise and one of these;


    All you need to do is strip the rifle down to a barreled-action, slide it into the vise all the way, install the Gas-Cylinder most of the way on and lay the protractor on the front Sightbase perpendicular to the barrel. Then, mark the reading with the red sliding dog on the face. Next, take the Protractor and lay it across the flat behind the sightbase on the receiver. The difference between that reading and your frontsight reading is where you are indexed at. If you read less than 1/2-degree, your indexing is correct. Actually, perfect indexing is 1/3 of a degree or 20 minutes before straight up. If you read more than 1-degree at most, your indexing is off too much and you'll lose alot of sight adjustment at longer-ranges if you ever need it. But, as I said, if you aren't interested in match-shooting of any kind and can get it to print in the black at 100 yards, have at it.
    Last edited by Dave Waits; 06-22-2011 at 10:02.
    "Diligentia, Vis, Celeritas"
    Jeff Cooper

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts