Dean's Gun Restoration
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Thread: M2 parts...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Default M2 parts...

    I am wondering how common M2 parts are to find on carbines.

    Anyone know which parts to look out for, and whether it would really make any difference if the gun doesn't have an M2 receiver?

    Thanks
    -

  2. #2
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    Mar 2010
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    If you have all of the parts and none are registered and taxed then you have committed a felony. It does not matter how the receiver is marked many people have made this mistake and paid dearly. If you want to shoot some full auto guns many ranges rent them. If you are concerned about the Zombie Apocalypse Simi-Auto will be more effective and allow you to kill more Zombies.

  3. #3
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    Jan 2012
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    I'm not interested acquiring. Quite the opposite.

    I am wondering if I need to be looking out for parts in a rifle which has been made from various other rifles. I would guess that there aren't a bunch of M2 parts out there, but I like to watch out. I know more about ARs, and I know which parts are strictly M16 parts, but can be found sometimes in Ars. I would like to avoid finding an M1 with any of the "evil" M2 parts in it. I think I read somewhere that some M1s have M2 trigger groups, for instance.


    thx

  4. #4
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    Parts you should not find in an M1 carbine are, type 4 hammer (M2 hammer. They do not work very well in an M1.) Disconnecter block,disconnecter lever and selector switch. The type 6 trigger housing, the type 3 sear and the type 6 slide all are OK to have in an M1even though they are needed in an M2.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tuna View Post
    Parts you should not find in an M1 carbine are, type 4 hammer (M2 hammer. They do not work very well in an M1.) Disconnecter block,disconnecter lever and selector switch. The type 6 trigger housing, the type 3 sear and the type 6 slide all are OK to have in an M1even though they are needed in an M2.
    The tech manuals state that the M2 type trigger housing, sear and slide should be reserved for M2 repair, however they can be used if the M1 type equivalent parts inventories are exhausted. I've had rebuilts which contained one or more of them. If I remember correctly the M2 hammer works very well IF you shim it with a small washer?

  6. #6
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    I think that the M2 sear is the best for a good trigger pull they seem smoother.
    Last edited by Johnny in Texas; 07-28-2012 at 10:32.

  7. #7
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    That is correct that an M2 hammer will work if you take up the space that the diconnector sits in on the hammer pin with a spacer of some kind but if you don't the hammer moves back and forth causing misfires if it doesn't line up with the firing pin.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    From the BATF site. Scroll down to page 12 for M-2.

    http://www.atf.gov/publications/down...-chapter-2.pdf


    The “combination of parts designed and intended for use in converting a weapon into a machinegun”
    language refers to a group of parts designed and intended to be used in converting a weapon into a
    machinegun. A typical example is those M2 carbine parts that are only used to permit fully automatic
    fire in a US Carbine M1 or M2.
    M2 Carbine conversion kit
    The above parts consisting of an M2 selector lever, selector lever spring, disconnector lever assembly,
    M2 disconnector, disconnector spring, disconnector plunger and M2 hammer
    are classified as a
    machinegun. These parts are used specifically for fully automatic fire and have no application in a
    semiautomatic carbine. While other parts such as an M2 sear, operating slide, trigger housing and stock
    are used in the fully automatic carbine, these parts are also appropriate for use in semiautomatic M1
    carbines.16

    Therefore, the M2 sear, operating slide, trigger housing and stock are not a combination of parts
    designed and intended for use in converting a weapon into a machinegun. Other commonly encountered
    16 TM9-1267, Cal. .30 Carbines M1, M1A1, M2, and M3, United States Government Printing Office, 1953

  9. #9
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    Aug 2009
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    I have a SA rebuild Underwood M1 that was obviously set up for full auto at one time. Everything for a M2 was there but all of the full auto trigger housing parts were removed except for the M2 hammer. I fired it for awhile before I became aware of the M2 hammer. It functioned OK but I replaced the hammer.
    Last edited by Rock; 07-30-2012 at 09:55.

  10. #10
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    Of course there is the stock as well. ( cut out for the selector lever)
    And I do believe if the carbinereeciever is marked M2, the feds class it as a machine gun even it does not have the required parts. (once a machine gun , always a machine gun)
    Last edited by John Sukey; 08-03-2012 at 07:42.

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