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Thread: women in combat

  1. #21
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    My experience with female soldiers, both officer and enlisted, indicates that unlike men, women have the option to opt out of any situation that they are uncomfortable with. They feel free to say "no, thanks " for a job or assignment that they consider dangerous or even uncomfortable. I know of combat aviation units that were held out from deployment because the command was unwilling to send the female unit commander into a combat situation. The realities of the Man/Woman, Father/Daughter, Son/Mother relationship render the male side "expendable", while the female side is not. Just what I have witnessed first hand. Regards, Clark

  2. #22
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    I wonder how long this will last after the body bags start arriving back here.

  3. #23
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    Actually there have been some very seriously wounded women who have lost limbs and 139 women troops KIA in the current wars on terror. But that has not dampened the enthusiasm of the supporters of "women in combat."

    I am reminded of the movie GI JANE in which a feminist senator who had never worn the uniform was pushing the female SEAL officer onward. I wonder how many of the women politicians advocating this, and other civilian government fans, have ever worn the uniform or, heaven help us, been near harm's way in the service. Not too damn many, I'll bet.
    Last edited by Griff Murphey; 01-28-2013 at 04:52.

  4. #24
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    when the women are going through infantry training and are not making it due to the differences in physiology the standards will be lowered. always happens that way. instead of making sure the people are capable, they reduce the required capabilities...

  5. #25
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    I think that allowing women and gays in the military can be both good and bad.
    When I was in the Army a soldier had to go all the way to town and pay for sex. Under the current system this is no longer necessary. Now one only needs to go to the next tent or foxhole.
    On the other hand it might be best if a soldier keeps his mind and eyes on the mission and enemy and not the big teats on the person sharing his foxhole. Could be an unnecessary and fatal distraction.
    As far as pulling a trigger and killing an enemy, anyone can do that, a 10 year old or a 90 year old.
    Also when a trooper becomes pregnant , how long do they remain on the line?? 3 months. 6 months?? 8.5 months?? Or is it an immediate ticket home.
    Best bet would be all women battalions. Let them swim or sink on their own merits. No sexual distraction.
    Jim C
    Last edited by jim c 351; 01-28-2013 at 06:10.

  6. #26
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    [QUOTE=Griff Murphey;283419]Actually there have been some very seriously wounded women who have lost limbs and 139 women troops KIA in the current wars on terror. But that has not dampened the enthusiasm of the supporters of "women in combat"
    True, BUT those women were in combat zone, NOT engaging in combat. (other than the helicopter pilots)

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Sukey View Post
    ...those women were in combat zone, NOT engaging in combat. (other than the helicopter pilots)
    Sorry John, but in my association with M1 For Vets I've met at least one woman. Her wounds weren't the result of a game of cards; she was engaged in direct combat with an armed enemy.

    There is no question whether women can pull triggers or suffer wounds and death. They can and do.

    However, currently those women are doing it as an episodic sideline to their primary duties. They are not going out looking for a fight for days and weeks on end. They are not enduring the stresses, strains, and physical demands that come with extended infantry or armored combat.

    So the question becomes "Can they do that part of combat?"

    Based on what I've seen and has been reported, I'm not convinced they can.

    I could be wrong but the price of me being proven right is way too high.

    Maury

  8. #28
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    During WWII, the Russian women proved their effectiveness in combat along side their male counterparts. Some women were especially skilled as snipers.

    Of course, Russia was in dire need of fighters as Hitler came very close to Stalingrad. Fortunately, we are not against the wall to have women as a necessity to fight.

    During WWII, is it interesting to note that when Hitler needed fighters due to manpower shortages, he enlisted the help of old men and children, and not women (to my knowledge). I know there were female prison guards but know of none in direct combat.

  9. #29
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    I think the only people that can really voice an opinion on this are the people they have to serve with. From my experience being a grunt in the USMC in Vietnam was a bitch with the combat load and weeks out in the bush. If the people they are going to serve with in combat feel that women can hack it, then it is OK. I also agree when they start coming home in body bags by the dozen every month, or taken prisoner and raped, they might have a different opinion.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ltdave View Post
    when the women are going through infantry training and are not making it due to the differences in physiology the standards will be lowered. always happens that way. instead of making sure the people are capable, they reduce the required capabilities...
    That's already the case at the Army's Jump School.

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